Derbyshire’s new head coach Mickey Arthur distances himself from vacant England position


Derbyshire’s new head coach Mickey Arthur distances himself from vacant England position… but admits he envisages a return to the international scene in the future 

  • Mickey Arthur was speaking at his first press conference with Derbyshire 
  • The 53-year-old has distanced himself from the vacant position at England
  • He does though believe he could return to the international scene in the future
  • He has previously coached South Africa, Australia, Pakistan and Sri Lanka 











Mickey Arthur envisages a return to the international scene in future but has distanced himself from the vacant England job.

Speaking at his unveiling as Derbyshire’s new head coach, Arthur said he wanted to return to the top stage at some point but was committed to turning the English domestic game’s worst-performing team around first – they won just six times across all competitions in 2021.

‘Those days are probably not behind me and we will see what happens down the line. As they say in this world, never say never,’ the 53-year-old said.

Derbyshire coach Mickey Arthur says the vacant England position has ‘never crossed his mind’

But of England, added: ‘No, it hasn’t even crossed my mind. I’ve just done 12 years of international cricket and I’m very comfortable with the project I’ve got.

‘I don’t think that my coaching career would have been fulfilled without a stint in county cricket.’

Arthur has extensive experience on the global scene as head coach of his native South Africa, Australia and Pakistan prior to taking over a struggling Sri Lanka in December 2019.

Arthur was last with Sri Lanka before his contract ended last autumn and he opted for a new challenge

Arthur was last with Sri Lanka before his contract ended last autumn and he opted for a new challenge

But with his two-year contract coming to its end last autumn, he opted out of international cricket’s bio-secure environments for a new challenge here.

‘My Sri Lankan time coincided with the pandemic, which meant last year we had 264 days in a bubble,’ he explained.

‘My family are in Perth, Australia, my eldest daughter is 28 and lives in South Africa, she’s just had a daughter of her own and I haven’t seen family for two and a half years.

‘I sort of questioned myself and I thought it a good time to leave Sri Lanka. I’d achieved what I wanted to, and we had a good strong squad that was starting to develop.

‘Then, the Derbyshire project came up. It has been a struggling county, it’s in unfashionable county and I thought “that’s the county I want to go to.” I want to come and be able to make a difference.’

Although he is yet to sample it firsthand, he also dismissed domestic cricket here as a source of England’s recent Test failings.

‘County cricket has made a lot more players than it has broken,’ Arthur said.

Arthur has also coached Pakistan (pictured), Australia and South Africa in his career

Arthur has also coached Pakistan (pictured), Australia and South Africa in his career

‘In 2019 when England won the World Cup, nobody was questioning county cricket.

‘When England won the Ashes in Australia in 2010–11, nobody questioned county cricket.

’In fact, they said it was because of county cricket. I was part of Western Australia at that point, and I got the Australian coaching job on the back of England going to Australia and whooping them.

‘At that time, everybody was questioning the Sheffield Shield in Australia. It goes with the results in international cricket. So, to label it as county cricket’s fault is far-fetched.

‘England simply haven’t scored enough runs. If numbers one, two and three don’t give you that foundation, you are always in a battle and I just think if you want to lay the blame somewhere, you can lay it right there.’

Advertisement



Source link