England pace bowler Brydon Carse keen to embrace ‘enforcer’ role after impressing in Holland win


England pace bowler Brydon Carse keen to embrace the role of ‘enforcer’ after impressing in Holland win – and sets his sights on following Durham team-mate Matt Potts into Test set-up

  • Brydon Carse has admitted he wants to become England’s white-ball ‘enforcer’ 
  • The Durham quick also said he is aiming to make it into the country’s Test set-up
  • Carse impressed in England’s six-wicket ODI win against Holland on Sunday
  • He trapped Tom Cooper with just his second ball and broke the 90mph barrier 

Durham quick Brydon Carse wants to become England’s white-ball ‘enforcer’ – and follow his county colleague Matthew Potts into the Test set-up.

Carse was comfortably the fastest bowler on parade during England’s six-wicket win over the Netherlands in the second one-day international in Amsterdam on Sunday. 

He trapped Tom Cooper with his second ball, broke the 90mph barrier and sent a snorter past the helmet of Dutch captain Scott Edwards.

Durham quick Brydon Carse (pictured right) wants to become England’s white-ball ‘enforcer’

He trapped Tom Cooper with his second ball, broke the 90mph barrier and sent a snorter past the helmet of Dutch captain Scott Edwards in England's ODI win against Holland on Sunday

He trapped Tom Cooper with his second ball, broke the 90mph barrier and sent a snorter past the helmet of Dutch captain Scott Edwards in England’s ODI win against Holland on Sunday 

Now he has his sights set on a role once filled by Liam Plunkett, formerly of Durham himself, who used to take wickets for England in the middle overs before he was ruthlessly ditched after the 2019 World Cup triumph.

The term ‘enforcer’ has occasionally been used and abused by England teams. Stuart Broad was once miscast in the role, and it can be a synonym for testing out the middle of the pitch as much in hope as expectation.

But the 26-year-old Carse, who was born in Port Elizabeth, South Africa, but has a British passport, does not shy away from the description – especially at a time when English fast bowlers seem injured more often than not. For the moment, at least, they may be a gap in the market.

‘That’s what I’d like to see myself as,’ he said. ‘I want to come on and be aggressive. I want to make an impact.

He has his sights set on a role once filled by Liam Plunkett (above), formerly of Durham himself

He has his sights set on a role once filled by Liam Plunkett (above), formerly of Durham himself

‘Eoin Morgan said I am going to come on first or second change and look to bowl through the middle, be aggressive, use my pace, use my bouncer and just make it difficult. I’m striving to be like Liam Plunkett.’

Carse, whose Zimbabwe-born father James, another seamer, had a season with Northamptonshire in 1983, made a good impression when he was called up for England’s emergency one-day squad against Pakistan last summer because of a Covid crisis.

He took five wickets in the third game at Edgbaston, where he also helped Craig Overton knock off the winning runs in a chase of 332.

Carse was then taken to Australia over the winter as part of the England Lions squad, and might even have earned a Test debut in the Ashes had he not torn cartilage in his right knee – an injury that delayed his return this summer for Durham.

Carse also wants to follow his Durham team-mate Matthew Potts (above) into the Test set-up

Carse also wants to follow his Durham team-mate Matthew Potts (above) into the Test set-up

But that tour and the success of Potts on Test debut recently against New Zealand at Lord’s have confirmed in Carse’s mind that a Test cap is his next goal.

‘To be around that group, and see how they prep before an Ashes tour, definitely gave me something to aspire to,’ he said. ‘I want to play red- and white-ball cricket, and I want to play Test cricket for England.

‘When things are clicking, it’s good to bowl quick. It adds a different dimension to the team. If I can be bowling around that 90mph mark, then I am sure it will create opportunities for me in any side in which I am playing.’

Asked whether he or Potts bowled more quickly, he opted for modesty. ‘I’ll keep that one to myself,’ he said. After watching him on Sunday, the England management have no doubt formed their own views.

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