Scotland captain Rachel Corsie accuses SFA of not treating national women’s team equally


‘It makes you feel like you’re less important than others’: Scotland captain Rachel Corsie accuses the SFA of not treating national women’s team equally, as she insists ‘there’s a reason so many players feel frustrated’

  • Rachel Corsie was among the group who shared anger over perceived ticket cap
  • In a public spat, the SFA hit back to say stars were guilty of ‘ill-informed sharing’ 
  • She has now accused the body of not treating the national women’s team equally
  • But Corsie has also revealed the squad’s frustration runs deeper than ticket sales

Scotland captain Rachel Corsie has accused the SFA of not treating the national women’s team equally – and claims they have made them feel ‘less important than others’.

Corsie was among a number of leading players, including Caroline Weir and Erin Cuthbert, who Tweeted their frustration this week about a perceived cap on tickets for Tuesday’s World Cup qualifier against Spain at Hampden.

In what has become an awkward public spat, the governing body hit back by saying the players were guilty of ‘ill-informed sharing’ and creating ‘negative headlines’.

Scotland star Rachel Corsie accused the SFA of not treating the national women’s team fairly

The SFA insisted procedures for selling tickets were the same across all levels of Scottish football and that every seat at 52,000 capacity Hampden would be made available if the demand was there. 

They also said their biggest-ever marketing spend for a Scotland women’s national team match had been allocated to promote the Spain game.

But Aston Villa defender Corsie has revealed that the squad’s frustrations run deeper than the row over ticket sales.

Captain Corsie was among a group of players to air their frustration over a perceived ticket cap

Captain Corsie was among a group of players to air their frustration over a perceived ticket cap

Following the tweets, the governing body said the players were guilty of 'ill-informed sharing'

Following the tweets, the governing body said the players were guilty of ‘ill-informed sharing’

‘I think equality is always something that is going to need to be pushed all the time, especially for the women’s game, to have the chance to catch up,’ said the 32-year-old.

‘And it may never catch up. You know, the men’s game has such a huge start and has built a foundation.

‘There’s history. And I don’t think it’s necessarily about catching up either.

‘I think there has been things in the past that we’ve highlighted that showed that there hasn’t always been equality across the board.

Corsie (L) has revealed that the squad's frustrations run deeper than the row over ticket sales

Corsie (L) has revealed that the squad’s frustrations run deeper than the row over ticket sales

‘I think a portion of that comes down to the fact we know the resources aren’t provided to the best level.

‘Or we know what’s viewed as a high-performing level. In comparison to what either club environments are, what other national teams are given, other teams in the association are given, aren’t equal to what we get.

‘When you become aware of that it makes you feel like you’re less important than others.’

Corsie said she did not regret the Tweet shared earlier this week by the Scotland players.

Aston Villa defender Corsie has also insisted she does not regret the Tweet shared this week

Aston Villa defender Corsie has also insisted she does not regret the Tweet shared this week

She has since held talks with SFA chief executive Ian Maxwell but hopes their discussion goes further than just words.

‘I think now it needs to be about the action of those conversations,’ Corsie said.

‘Conversations have happened before. Having the opportunity to have these discussions is very important but now it’s a case of we need to see a difference.

‘It needs to be something that’s felt. There’s a reason so many players feel frustrated. It doesn’t come from nowhere.’ 

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Last year, the SFA launched a strategic review over the four years to 2025, pledging to ‘accelerate the growth of girls’ and women’s football’ and take the women’s game ‘to the next level domestically and internationally’. 

As part of this, the women’s side have played all of their World Cup qualifiers at Hampden this campaign.

Former Scottish Women’s Football chief Fiona McIntyre was also appointed as the new head of women’s and girls’ football.

However, Corsie says the elite environment around the women’s team needs to keep improving.

Corsie has held talks with SFA chief executive Ian Maxwell (above) but is now keen for action

Corsie has held talks with SFA chief executive Ian Maxwell (above) but is now keen for action

She said: ‘We’ve sacrificed a lot over the last five, ten, 15 years. It’s always something you’re constantly battling and something you take on as a female athlete to push barriers, push boundaries, work hard for success so you can ask for more.

‘It’s a constant cycle probably and it will continue to be a battle.

‘A lot of things the SFA have done – like the fact we play at Hampden – shows a lot of forward steps but there are still a lot of things that happen at a day-to-day level where you can see there are still ways to go.’

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